Eat foods that eventually rot, and more good advice

 
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Thank goodness for documentaries because, let’s face it, they can be an awfully convenient way to catch up on an important topic. Such is the case with the PBS documentary based on Michael Pollan’s book, In Defense of Food, which asks What should we eat to be healthy? 

In answering this question, Pollan points out the unhealthy nature of a diet like ours, which depends heavily on red meat, white flour, and processed foods. This isn't really news, of course. What sets this documentary apart is its focus on simple solutions. Pollan suggests a variety of easy-to-use ways to return to a more healthful way of eating. But for me it still boils down to his oft-quoted advice: Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants. That's guidance I can easily live by, perhaps because it's so simple.

Eat foods that will eventually rot, have been cooked by humans, contain fewer than five ingredients, and are not advertised on TV.

 

As always, Pollan’s work is well-researched and thoughtfully presented. The visuals are tasteful and the combination of Pollan’s presentations and interviews with experts, innovators, and leaders in the good food movement kept it interesting.

To be fair, the topics of healthful eating and good food have long been important and compelling to me, but I especially appreciated the accessibility that this film offers viewers. The simplicity of its message resonates with me since it is so easy to feel overwhelmed by information in today’s media-saturated society.

 

Takeaways: Eat foods that will eventually rot, have been cooked by humans, contain fewer than five ingredients, and are not advertised on TV, because they’re likely to be processed.

You can view “In Defense of Food” on the PBS website or find it on Netflix.


Madeline Judge is a former Stone Pier Press News Fellow. In the last year, she has shifted her focus from producing food to writing about it in the hopes of informing people about where their food originates and affecting change in how it gets from farm to fork.